News

Changes to the fishing licence in England and Wales

Posted on February 24, 2017

The Environment Agency will launch, on 1 March 2017, a new website “Get a Fishing Licence”. This simplifies the process of buying a fishing licence for England & Wales: www.gov.uk/get-a-fishing-licence. You can now buy a rod licence on line, by phone or at the Post Office. EA say this is part of a series of improvements to the service, which include:

•        Free fishing for junior anglers, up to the age of 17, announced in November 2016

•        The fishing licence now lasts for 12 months from the day it is bought, rather than expiring at the end of March each year

Environment Agency vacancy: Deputy Director of Agriculture, Fisheries & the Natural Environment

Posted on February 06, 2017

The Environment Agency in England is seeking a new Head of Fisheries (or, more correctly, a new Deputy Director of Agriculture, Fisheries & the Natural Environment), to replace Sarah Chare who has moved on to a Midlands Area Manager’s role within EA.

Sarah was a passionate advocate for rivers and fish and a great friend to WTT; she will be much missed but we wish her all the very best in her new role. 

Details of the vacant post are here.  Closing date of 13 February. 

2016 WTT Annual Raffle Results

Posted on December 15, 2016

With many thanks to Sage, William Daniel & Famous Fishing, The Peacock at Rowsley & Haddon Fisheries, Paul Kenyon and Phoenix Lines for donating the prizes, and to all those who bought tickets enabling us to raise £3500 towards our conservation work.

1st Prize, ticket no. 294, Mr K Freshwater (Dundee)

2nd Prize, ticket no. 4095, Mrs S Twiddy (Warminster)

Celtic Sea Trout Project Report published

Posted on December 13, 2016

An 850-page report, outlining a three-year research project on sea trout in the Celtic (Irish) Sea has just been published.

There are some important messages from the work. We now think we know that Celtic sea trout are organised into nine genetic groups (so a trout is not just a trout) and that most sea trout (but not all) stay close to their natal river.

But, there is significant mixing of stocks at sea with individual fish travelling as far as 300km to feed and possibly pioneer into other areas, thus introducing new genetic material to that patch. As a consequence of this stock mixing at sea, fisheries taking trout are mixed stock fisheries where the home water of any individual fish cannot be known just by looking at it.

River Irt Habitat Workshop 20 December

Posted on December 09, 2016

WTT Conservation Officer Gareth Pedley, along with the West Cumbria Rivers Trust and the EA, are running workshop demonstrating river habitat improvement works such as coppicing and tree laying to create fish cover.

The workshop will take place Tuesday 20 December 9.30am—3.30pm on the River Irt at Gaterigghow, Gosforth 

This event is ideally suited to angling club members and riparian owners who undertake river work.

Natural flood management, woody material and fish movement

Posted on December 07, 2016

Scotland's Centre of Expertise for Waters (CREW) has just published a report, The effect of natural flood management in-stream wood placements on fish movement in Scotland, that provides a review and analysis of information on the passage by fish at wooden obstacles (woody placements), used for flood management.

Click here to view the report. 

WTT contributed to the expert panel that informed the report, through one of its trustees and Argyll Fisheries Trust Senior Biologist, Alan Kettle-White. 

EA Annual Fisheries Report 2015-16

Posted on December 07, 2016

The Environment Agency has just published its 2015-16 Fisheries Report, together with reports from each of its 16 area teams.

The reports highlight ongoing fisheries work in England, including the productivity of WTT's excellent partnership with the Agency across the country. Click here to view both the national and regional reports 

Fish Legal helps wild trout fishery following pollution

Posted on December 02, 2016

Fish Legal has helped the Inler Angling Club in Northern Ireland to start the process of restoring a purely wild trout fishery using compensation money obtained following a 2013 pollution.

This settlement is a very good example of how a wild trout fishery can claim compensation from a polluter and use the money to improve habitat in the river.

The Inler Angling Club received an Advisory Visit from the Wild Trout Trust earlier this year.

Alastair Driver joins WTT’s Advisors

Posted on December 01, 2016

At WTT, we strive to ensure that we employ staff of immense quality, expertise and knowledge. But, they can’t know it all, so we have a group of experts in their fields who advise, independently and pro bono, on a range of issues.We are absolutely delighted to announce that Prof Alastair Driver, recently retired as National Biodiversity Manager with the Environment Agency and an acknowledged expert in a wide range of conservation and ecological disciplines, has joined that team. Alastair will bring us his vast experience and expertise in catchment management and restoration and specific areas of ‘above-water’ conservation e.g. otters and water voles.In addition to his voluntary work with WTT and several other NGOs, and his professorial role at Exeter University, Alastair is now getting stuck into planning a new professional life as a consultant specialising in catchment restoration.

WTT’s Advisory Team

Prof Alastair Driver joins an awesome team, giving freely of their time and expertise to WTT:

Ron Holloway

Posted on November 24, 2016

Ron Holloway

We are very sorry to report the death of Ron Holloway today. He is a great loss to the world of trout conservation and will be sorely missed. Our condolences go to his family and his large network of friends.

Just a few days before he died, WTT Director Shaun Leonard presented Ron with the Bernard Venables Award. This is the news item that announced that award: 

Ron Holloway is greatly respected in the world of wild trout fishery management. He keepered the Martyr Worthy fishery on the Itchen for 34 years and visited other fisheries, across the world, to offer his experience and bring back to the UK what he’d learned, especially in North America. In the mid-80s, he was extolling and practising ideas that are the bedrock of today’s fishery management: Ron spoke of the need for holistic catchment management and used woody debris to create cover and habitat diversity in his own river. His first book, You Should Have Been Here Last Thursday, outlined his thinking and tales from decades on and in his river. Ron has influenced and inspired many of today’s riverkeepers and activists for our rivers and their trout, including lots of students (and staff) at Sparsholt. He was a founding father of the Wild Trout Society, the progenitor of the Wild Trout Trust.